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Archive for the ‘Icons’ Category

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LW001505

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Original caption, ca. 1951, Utah, USA — On the Measured 13 Mile Straight-a-way Course, Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah. Roland R. Free, Making a New American Motor-Cycle Record. Roland R. Free, of Los Angeles, Calif., riding a British-Vincent Motor-Cycle in a prone position to cut down wind resistance approximately 2 miles, on Sept. 11, 1950, established a new American speed record for 1 mile @ 156.71 miles per hour. Mr. Free’s picture was taken from an automobile running parallel to the black line while traveling in excess of 100 M.P.H. just before the auto reached the measured 1 mile zone of the 13 mile straight-a-way course, Mr. Free caught up with the automobile and immediately after his picture was taken, he gave his Motor-Cycle the gun; the photographers say it seemed like they were still, the way he left them with his sudden burst of speed. — Image by © Lake County Museum

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LW001507

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Original caption, ca. 1951, Utah, USA — Mormon Meteor. The World’s Greatest Unlimited Speed Record Maker, Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah. The Days Run Completed. Holding All Speed Records from 10 Miles to 7,134 and from One Hour to 48 Hours. Mormon Meteor: David Abbott (Ab) Jenkins. Owner-Driver, and founder of the Salt Flats as a race course. Utah born and reared 1883. Religion, (Mormon). Holder of more world’s unlimited records than any man in history of sports. The only man who has ever driven an automobile continuously without relief for 24 hours, under supervision of contest board. Awarded champion of champions plaque and cup for the world’s safest driver. In 1950 at age 67, he made his fastest lap of 13 miles @ 199.19 M.P. H. Raced his last time in July, 1951. Now retired. He attributes his stamina to the fact, he never in his life, tasted liquor or tobacco. Average M.P.H, Distance: 199.19, 10 Miles — Image by © Lake County Museum

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Miles Davis

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Always count your money.

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“My father told me, that my grandfather told him, whenever he got some money, no matter where or who he got it from, to count it and see if it was all there.  He said you can’t trust no one when it comes to money — not even people in your own family.

One time my grandfather gave my father what he said was $1,000 and sent him to the bank with it.  The bank was thirty miles away from where they lived.  It was about 100 degrees in the shade — summertime in Arkansas.   And he had to walk and ride a horse.

When my father got down there to the bank, he counted the money and there was only $950.  He counted it again and got the same amount: $950.  So he went on back home, so scared he was just about ready to shit his pants.  When he got back he went to my grandfather and looked at him and said that he lost $50.  So Grandpa just stood there and looked at him and said, ‘Did you count the money before you left? Do you know if it was all there?’  My father said — no, he didn’t count the money before he left.  ‘That’s right,’ my grandfather told him, ‘because I didn’t give you nothin’ but $950. You didn’t lose anything. But didn’t I tell you to count the money, anybody’s money, even mine? Here’s $50. Count it. And then go ahead back and put that money in the bank like I told you.’ Now what you got to keep in mind about all of this is that not only was the bank thirty miles away, but it was also hotter than a motherfucker.

It was cold of my grandfather to do that.  But sometimes you’ve got to be cold like that.  It was a lesson my father never forgot and he passed it on to his kids.  So today I count all my money.”

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–Miles Davis

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“When you blame yourself, you learn from it. If you blame someone else, you don’t learn nothing, cause hey, it’s not your fault, it’s his fault, over there.”

-Joe Strummer of  The Clash

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Joe Strummer of The Clash

Joe Strummer of The Clash

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"London Calling" --The Clash

"London Calling" --The Clash

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Joe Strummer of The Clash

Joe Strummer of The Clash

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Mick Jones of The Clash

Mick Jones of The Clash

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“Don’t let your mouth write a check that your tail can’t cash.”

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–Bo Diddley

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Bo Diddley had an enormous impact on the development of popular music, largely due to his emphasis on rhythmic elements.

Bo Diddley had an enormous impact on the development of popular music, largely due to his emphasis on rhythmic elements.

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“I opened the door for a whole lot of people– and they just ran through and left me holding the knob.”

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–Bo Diddley

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Bo Diddley in action on his signature Gretsch guitar --late 1950s.

Bo Diddley in action on his signature Gretsch guitar --late 1950s.

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“I thank you in advance for the great round of applause I’m about to get.”

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–Bo Diddley

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Bo Diddley on guitar with Jerome Green on the left playing maracas  --late 1950s,

Bo Diddley on guitar with Jerome Green on the left playing maracas --late 1950s.

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“I made Bo Diddley in ’55, and everybody freaked out.  Caucasian kids threw Beethoven in the garbage can.”

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–Bo Diddley

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“New Yorkers love it when you spill your guts out there.  Spill your guts at Wimbledon and they make you stop and clean it up.”


–Jimmy Connors

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Mr. A. F. Wilding, Wimbledon Champion.

Mr. A. F. Wilding, Wimbledon Champion.

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Max Bubeck sitting on his 135.58mph hybrid Indian Chief/Scout that he rode at Rosamond Dry Lake on June 27th, 1948.  The Pop Shunk-built "Chout" is as lean and mean as a straight razor except for two big-assed carburetors that look big enough to pluck poultry. Bubeck's "Chout" still holds the record for the world's fastest unfaired Indian motorcycle.

Max Bubeck sitting on his 135.58mph hybrid Indian Chief/Scout that he rode at Rosamond Dry Lake on June 27th, 1948. The Pop Shunk-built "Chout" is as lean and mean as a straight razor except for two big-assed carburetors that look big enough to pluck poultry. Bubeck's "Chout" still holds the record for the world's fastest unfaired Indian motorcycle.

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“Mad Max” Bubeck made a name for himself dominating the enduro scene from the 1930s to the 1970s.  Bubeck was also a speed racer & builder who in June of 1948 rode his Indian “Chout” (an Indian Chief 80 c.i. engine jammed into the smaller & lighter Scout frame) to a record speed of 135.58 mph on the Rosamond Dry Lake north of Los Angeles. It’s a record that still stands for an unstreamlined, normally aspirated 80 cubic inch displacement Indian motorycle.  After retiring from competition in the late-1970s, Bubeck continued to be active in motorcycling, doing everything from restoring classic Indian motorcycles to sponsoring antique motorcycle meetings.

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Mad Max Bubeck on his famous & record setting Indian "Chout".

Mad Max Bubeck on his famous & record setting Indian "Chout".

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One of Bubeck’s most popular wins came in 1950 aboard the new Indian Warrior. That year, he won the Cactus Derby, a long-distance desert race and mountain race originated in Riverside, California. The race was unique in that it started at midnight. That year, Bubeck’s bike lost its lighting barely an hour into the race. He managed to continue by riding with other riders and using their lights. A few times he lost touch with the other riders and rode in complete darkness. In that same event, a long, slow-moving freight train was blocking a crossing. Bubeck sped ahead of the train and crossed the tracks so as to not lose too much time. Despite the darkness, the trains and riding a supposedly uncompetitive bike, Bubeck still managed to win the event. It went down as one of the most memorable victories in his career.

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“The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.”

 

–Thomas Paine

 

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1966 Triumph motorcycle ad

1966 Triumph motorcycle ad

 

 

Vintage Triumph motorcycle ad

Vintage Triumph motorcycle ad

 

 

Vintage Triumph motorcycle ad

Vintage Triumph motorcycle ad

 

 

Vintage Triumph Motorcycle ad

Vintage 1977 Triumph Bonneville motorcycle ad

 


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