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Archive for the ‘designers’ Category

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“Space and light and order. Those are the things that men need just as much as they need bread or a place to sleep.”
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–Le Corbusier

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Le Corbusier

Architect Le Corbusier sitting in chair & holding book in hands-- Paris France 1965.

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“To create architecture is to put in order. Put what in order? Function and objects.”

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–Le Corbusier

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Le Corbusier

Architect Le Corbusier working on project for French ministry of reconstruction in his Paris atelier-- Paris, France 1965.

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“The home should be the treasure chest of living.”

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–Le Corbusier

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Le Corbusier

Architect Le Corbusier sitting in chair with book in hands, glasses perched on his forehead-- Paris, France 1965.

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“I prefer drawing to talking. Drawing is faster, and leaves less room for lies.”

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–Le Corbusier

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Le Corbusier

Swiss architect Le Corbusier leaning down to write w. his glasses pushed back on his forehead-- Venice, Italy 1952.

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“Architecture is the learned game, correct and magnificent, of forms assembled in the light.”


–Le Corbusier

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“If a cluttered desk is the sign of a cluttered mind, what is the significance of a clean desk?”  –Dr. Laurence J. Peter


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vintage desk

William Allen White's old roll-top desk heaped high with books, papers, packages and a rickety chair-- Empoira, KS 1944.

 

Mid century modern desk

Desk designed by industrial designer Donald Deskey-- 1958.

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“Be daring, be different, be impractical, be anything that will assert integrity of purpose and imaginative vision against the play-it-safers, the creatures of the commonplace, the slaves of the ordinary”  –Cecil Beaton


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Cecil Beaton

Cecil Beaton drinking while wearing his fourth costume of the evening, as host of his garden party. --circa 1948

 

 

Cecil Beaton--  his vanity knew no bounds.

Cecil Beaton-- his vanity knew no bounds.

 

 Cecil Beaton Stephen TennantPablo Picasso Cecil Beaton

 

Cecil Beaton

 

 

Photographer Cecil Beaton adjusting the lens on a primitive camera in his studio-- Circa 1929.

Photographer Cecil Beaton adjusting the lens on a primitive camera in his studio, U.K. --circa 1929.

 

Cecil Beaton-- Lounging Lizard.

Cecil Beaton-- put that in your pike a smoke it.

 

Cecil Beaton

Photographer Cecil Beaton escorting Francis Doble (Lady Lindsey Hogg) to the wedding of Lord Herbert Equerry & Lady Mary Hope-- Circa 1936

 

 

Actress Ina Claire hugging Cecil Beaton at the opening of "Once Is Enough"--  circa 1937

Actress Ina Claire hugging Cecil Beaton at the opening of "Once Is Enough"-- circa 1937

 

Cecil Beaton

Photographer/designer Cecil Beaton at the switchboard doing his duty as an Air Raid Precautions operator on the estate of Lord and Lady Pembroke-- circa 1940

 

 

Fashion designer Gabrielle (Coco) Chanel w. photographer Cecil Beaton.

Fashion designer Gabrielle (Coco) Chanel w. photographer Cecil Beaton-- circa 1937

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People ask how can a Jewish kid from the Bronx do preppy clothes? Does it have to do with class and money? It has to do with dreams.”  

–Ralph Lauren

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DNR Polo 2

 

DNR Polo 3

 

DNR Polo 4

 

DNR Polo 5


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“If you’re going to wear madras, you don’t want to wear something that looks like your grandfather’s,” said Thom Browne. ”Actually, your grandfather’s madras would be cool,” he amended. ”It’s your father’s that you don’t want.”

”Preppy looks so cool when it looks effortless,” Mr. Browne said, ”but when it looks contrived, there’s nothing worse.”

 

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After Six formal jacket and taffeta bow tie & Palm Beach madras patchwork (in)formal suit –from GQ magazine, 1973 (Image via Black Tie Guide)

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Actor and film critic Rex Reed relaxes in a wicker chair on Great Harbour Cay, in the Bahamas.  Photo by the legendary photographer Slim Aarons, 1973.

 

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brad_1245723cI knew there was a reason I loved the wardrobe so much–

 

Belstaff, which was founded in Longton, Staffordshire, in 1924, opened up its 85-year-old archives to West and supplied original, classic designs for Pitt-as-Button’s screen wardrobe.

When Benjamin Button is riding his vintage Indian motorcycle through Louisiana he is wearing the Belstaff ‘Panther’ jacket in dark-brown leather, a timeless classic as popular today as it was 50 years ago. At another pivotal point in his life, Button takes off on his Triumph motorbike wearing the Belstaff ‘Button’ blouson in black leather, a ‘new’ classic based on an original design. In another key scene, opposite Tilda Swinton who plays diplomat’s wife, Elizabeth Abbott, Button is in a vintage Belstaff shearling jacket in black leather with cream collar.

Link to Belstaff/Button story

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Paul Smith always stands for color, pattern and cheek; but since so much of his tailored clothing this season was cut from conservative fabrics with gray or brown backgrounds, what was under the jacket became the statement maker. Sportswear came in corduroys, stonewashed black denim and lots of tartan, especially Black Watch.  Foulard print scarves were layered for a bohemian effect.

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Kim Jones, Dunhill’s creative director, will put his vision of a modern Dunhill on the Paris menswear catwalk at the Maison de l’Architecture on Sunday. (Chris Moore/Karl Prouse)

It is England, 1914. Imagine Alfred Dunhill dashing along in his motor vehicle at a daring 12 miles an hour, his eyes flicking to his rose gold stopwatch, tooting his four-note horn, the entrepreneur in a leather coat with matching goggles. And all these magnificent pieces designed by himself.

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The heritage of Dunhill is so broad and so British: from its beginnings with the birth of the car to creating luxury accessories for motorcycling, aviation and the oh-so-fashionable smokers in the Roaring Twenties.

“This is from the 1920s – from the collaboration with Japan,” says Kim Jones, 32, Dunhill’s creative director, who will put his vision of a modern Dunhill on the Paris menswear catwalk at the Maison de l’Architecture on Sunday.

Jones was referring to a dynamic and ergonomic range of travel bags in wood-grain leather. But it would be a stretch to guess that a pen case from the 1920s had been the inspiration. (more…)

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Tommy Nutter boldly cut against the traditional Savile Row grain.

Tommy Nutter will always be known as the flamboyant bee in Savile Row’s stuffy bonnet.  It was the late 60s, and narrow suits ruled the day.  Trained as traditional tailor, the sexy and innovative Nutter was not happy following the status quo of Savile Row and literally took matters into his own hands.

Tommy Nutter- a peacock if ever there was.

He created a sensation with his bold, signature look- wide shoulders and unapologetic lapels.  Nutter became the darling of the celebrity scene- clothing the likes of Mick & Bianca Jagger, Elton John and The Beatles.

Paul, Ringo and John- clothing by Tommy Nutter.

His influence can still be seen today, through a legacy of apprentices who trained under him, and in the young new designers of today who are discovering his work.   Tommy Nutter has forever left a mark on Savile Row, and defined a moment in time when bigger truly was better.

British rock musician Mick Jagger and Nicaraguan Bianca Perez Morena de Marcias just after their Wedding in St Tropez, France on 12th May 1971.

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TARTAN Romancing the Plaid by Jeffrey Banks & Doria De La Chapelle

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Tartan makes me feel like no other fabric.  I can’t say it any better than the book, a must read- “Whenever the word tartan is mentioned, scores of exuberant images abound.  Like a flag, tartan evokes the Scottish nation and its colorful kilted clans.  It resonates with the wail of bagpipes.  It snaps to attention with its smart, symmetrical design.

But tartan is more than a design, it is a sign; and while it signifies kinship (real or imagined), country, and celebration of the Scots, its subtext is dignity, distinctiveness. and a sense of belonging- qualities that possess universal appeal. That is perhaps the reason why tartan, a textile indigenous to the Highlands, has evolved into one of the world’s most popular fabrics, beloved by just about everyone. Scot or not.”

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The impeccable Jeffrey Banks

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Knowing Jeffrey Banks, I can tell you that writing this book was a passionate labor of love for him.  An avid collector of all things tartan, particularly Black Watch, Jeffrey is the tartan authority and owns some of the greatest pieces I’ve seen– apparel, accessories, home furnishings, tartanware– you name it.  Jeffrey- I want that Black Watch toggle coat when you die!  No hurry, chap.

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Jeffrey Banks’ personal collection of tartanware. Photo by Thom Gilbert.

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Jeffrey Banks is one of those guys that seems to have been born with impeccable style.  As a high-schooler working at the legendary shop Britches, he was tapped by Ralph to come work for him.  Ralph became very fond of Jeffrey– he even lent him his own personal tuxedo and pumps for his Senior Prom.  Polo was a small company back then, so he worked directly with Ralph as his design assistant, and they are still close today.

Jeffrey, passionate about design, made the decision to leave Polo and finish his studies at Pratt Institute and Parsons.  Jeffrey later designed for Calvin, and Merona Sportswear, among others.  He launched his own menswear collection in 1977 to much acclaim, and is among the “who’s who” of fashion.  Jeffrey is one of the most dapper guys going, and a two-time winner of the Coty American Fashion Critics award.

I have a great story for you about Jeffrey in a kilt- but that’s for another time.

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